New Flag To Become National Symbol Of Remembrance

By STEVE WAINFOR
Published: July 02, 2010 NBC 4
COLUMBUS, Ohio — George Lutz lost his son while on patrol in Iraq in 2005.

During his grieving with family and friends, Lutz realized that there was not a national symbol representing those who gave their lives for their country. So he formed a cross-country campaign called Honor and Remember to visit all 50 states in five months.

“Our goal is to establish the Honor and Remember flag as a national symbol, recognizing all those that gave their lives for our country,” Lutz said.

Lutz was met by State Representative Joe Uecker at the Statehouse Friday. Representative Uecker was surprised that ideas like this have taken so long.

“It’s kind of unbelievable after 234 years that we do not have a symbol already,” Uecker said. Uecker is pushing to have the flag as a symbol for the state of Ohio as well.

Lutz feels that going state to state is what the campaign is all about.

“So it was important that we reach out state-by-state. Many states have decided that they wanted to adopt this symbol as their state symbol of remembrance. And so that is part of why this journey is so important,” Lutz said.

The flag’s colors and symbols were designed to represents the military over the decades. The folded flag emblem represents a life lost, while the eternal flame represents the spirit that has departed.

While in town, Lutz also visited the Ohio Department of Veterans Services, to try and spread the word and gain support for his effort. So far 20 states have some form of legislature in the works to adopt the flag. Virginia and Oklahoma have all ready adopted the flag as their state symbol.

Lutz has only been on the road a month now and still has a long way to go.

“I just hope that I do it justice for all of these families and for all these veterans that are with us now and that have gone before us,” he said.

If you would like to make a donation to Honor and Remember, you can go to www.honorandremember.org, and select “Donations.”